Can You Avoid Turning on the Heat in Dallas?

Cold, Dallas

Both environmentalists and penny pinchers can agree that there’s a special period of time, a climatic sweet spot, when one can avoid turning on either the AC or the heat. In Dallas, except for the extra-hardy, fall and spring are the most feasible times to let your heating and cooling – and your wallet — rest. Let’s take a look at some temperature averages and some forecasts for this winter to plan our strategy.

Average Dallas Weather

We know, “average weather” never seems to happen. But let’s take a historic look at Dallas’ climate anyway.

According to Intellicast, Dallas’ average November high temperature is a comfortable 66 degrees, with a robe-and-slipper-requiring low of 47. In December, when the average low falls below 40 degrees to a chilly 39, native Texans will surely be forced to turn the heat on. If you moved here from Alaska, you’ll probably be wearing shorts and opening all your windows.

January and February also have average lows hovering around 40 degrees. But March boasts an average high of 69 degrees and a low of 49, which is probably doable without heat. The average high doesn’t climb above 80 until May.

So theoretically, based on this Intellicast information, hardy Dallas souls could avoid using both AC and heat during the months of March, April, October and November. Makes you glad you don’t live in, say, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, where the low only creeps above 40 degrees in the summer months.

Winter 2015-2016 Predictions

In October, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its predictions for this coming winter. Prepare yourselves, fellow Texans: The NOAA says this winter will be colder and wetter than usual, all due to that infamous character, El Niño. This year, the boy is expected to have one of his strongest seasons ever, influencing climate and weather patterns.

The Live Weather Blogs website predicts Dallas will get 2.5 inches of snow this year, which is just over double the average snowfall. But not nearly as bad as 1977-78, which saw 17.6 inches. Or last year, when 5.8 inches fell!

Savings Game

Okay, so El Niño might mean turning the heat on a little more often than average Dallas temperatures would require. But you can still challenge yourself to use a little less. Here are some tips to persuade your family to minimize furnace use this winter:

  • Wondering what to get everybody for Christmas? Warm slippers. And festive house hats, colorful knit hats traditionally worn inside. Try to convince your kids that these are all the rage in Alaska or Siberia.
  • Make it a game. See who is the first person to break down and turn the heat on during the winter season. This can also be a daily game, to see how long everyone can go without touching the thermostat. The loser has to do the dishes that day.
  • Reward yourselves. Did you save on heat this winter? Environmentally minded people can send a contribution to a worthy cause. Average people can splurge on dinner. Misers can put the money in a jar and hide it under the bed.

Stay warm enough this winter, but don’t waste all your money on heating. If your heating system is more than 10 years old, it may not be very efficient. Call us today and we’ll help you determine whether upgrading to a higher efficiency furnace might be more cost effective.